Posts

The Shoulder Position – It won’t just strain your rotator cuff

So I had planned on stopping the “shoulders saga” after the previous two posts but then thought about this on the way to work today – there are a lot of ways to work on the shoulders that essentially do nothing for you, therapeutically.  I confess, in my past I have worked on shoulders for my benefit versus the benefit of my patient – but I was just a young buck, and didn’t know any better!  Dear therapists, repeat after me, “I will not punish my patients with painful soft tissue work for my own pleasure”.  Now then, what the hell am I talking about?

As you’ve read about before, the shoulder is an intricate and interesting structure with some pretty amazing functions that, when faced with a poor position to work from, will present with some problems.  I trust you’ve been doing some pre-hab, to correct your poor positioning and prevent future problems.

No doubt, at some point in your shoulder pain/discomfort/tightness past you’ve asked someone to give you a massage/shoulder rub/thumb-destroying good time.  No doubt, it hurt quite a bit, and if you were the victim of experienced hands, you may have had to use your safety word (which may or may not have been “popcorn”).  There is a decent chance you walked away and felt “better”, at least for a little bit.  Was it “better” in comparison to the excruciating pain you were just recently feeling?  Or did your shoulder pain go away only to come back in a day or two?  If you “felt a bit better” for a day or two, that’s good news, but the treatment was ultimately no different than popping a couple advil.

“Heresy!  Those patients’ muscles were sore and I stripped the hell out of their muscles and then they weren’t sore anymore!  What happened to “treating the cause???” – I fixed the problem!”

Did you?  Invariably, the rhomboids, levator scapulae, traps, rotator cuff muscles and maybe even the lats are going to be tender on a patient with an active shoulder complaint.  Taking this a step further, using trigger point therapy (or really just ischemic compression as there probably isn’t any true pain referral happening here), ART, stripping massage, or any of the other dozens of different soft tissue techniques on sore muscles is going to result in, “yeah that really hurts, but it hurts in a good way, you can press harder if you need to”.  Which means the patient believes the therapist is doing the right thing, and so does the therapist.  But WHY are the muscles tender and WHY did they develop this shoulder problem?  (The answer to this second question is not, “because they bailed awkwardly on a ring dip”)

Poor positioning and movement patterns.  This probably just sounds repetitive at this point but unless you work to correct your shoulder positioning, you are going to continue having problems.  Spend some time stretching out your “business” as Kelly Starrett would say.  Instead of being “bad” at certain movements, make sure you aren’t trying to execute those movements from a weak position and take the steps to improve your position.

Now, before I get attacked for “putting down” soft tissue work, which I’m not doing, let’s go back to how you should be approaching the solution to this problem.  You start with some poor scapulae positioning and then you do overhead work, pullups, oly lifting, etc. and experience some pain and your “bad shoulder” starts “acting up”.  By all means, see a therapist if you want to experience some serious pain, and naturally improve your pain status (after treatment) with regards to this acute situation.  Now that you’re past that, move forward and prevent future problems – ask your therapist what steps you should take (where to stretch, where to strengthen) to prevent future painful episodes.  Many times the tender muscles in an acute episode are not the muscles you should be working on to correct shoulder positioning.  For examples, the rhomboids are going to be sore in this acute situation, but they are more than likely weak and stretched away from their optimal position.  Pressing on them does nothing to improve shoulder positioning and may even make the situation worse.  Working on pec minor in an acute situation, isn’t going to do a whole lot to help with the patients pain, but would be the right step to take in improving shoulder positioning.

Now then, since you’re now seeing an awesome athletic therapist, massage therapist, physiotherapist or chiropractor that knows they’ve addressed your true problem and sent you on the path to wellness – Promise referrals, your first born, whatever, but make sure you thank your therapist for caring about you having some solid shoulders versus you coming back next time you do a work out with ring dips in it.

What’s that saying?  An ounce of prevention…?

Cheers Folks!

 

Dr. Adam Ball

The Shoulder Position and Why Your Traps Aren’t Actually That Huge

Hey Folks!

We’re back with an exciting blog post about some proper shoulder positioning – where your shoulder should be, what that helps you to accomplish functionally, and the effects its’ position has on your appearance.  This information will change your life… or maybe just your press, and snatch, and overhead squat, and bench/push ups, and just about everything else that involves your arms… oh, and also the way people look at you (in a good way).

 

Anatomical position AKA where god/evolution/whoever/whatever decided your shoulders SHOULD be.

Due to our forward and front facing world, many of us succumb to what PT all-star Kelly Starrett would call the “D-bag” shoulder position, also known as “bridal” shoulder.  This is bad news for form and function because of the numerous movements and muscles involved with the scapula (what you would call your “shoulder blade”).  The scapula is a weird looking bone that allows our shoulders to have an impressive range of motion.  So what’s the deal with anatomical position, and why should you strive for better shoulder position?  If your scapulae are abducted and protracted (rolled forwards), some muscles in the area are chronically shortened while others are chronically stretched/lengthened.  Imagine having to walk with one flat on and one stiletto on – it wouldn’t be fun, right?  That’s what your shoulders are doing when you have poor shoulder positioning and its’ related shortened and lengthened muscles.  Anatomical position is where your scapulae rest when your muscles are relaxed and unaffected by years of poor posture and movement patterns.  Perfection is near impossible when you take into consideration handedness and unilateral sports (almost all sports) – but having good shoulder position will help with many functional movements which helps insulate your shoulder from injury.

 

Squeezing your pecs together might make them dance, but does not make them work better.

Rolled in shoulders are a danger to us all, but mostly to your lateral clavicles while you’re benching, your wrists, elbows and glenohumeral joint while overhead, and like I said earlier, just about everything involving the movement of your arms.  Pinning your shoulders back while benching means your arms have a solid base to push from, not just air and somewhere for that weight to push your shoulders, resulting in injury.  Having adequate range of motion in your shoulders means your elbows and wrists can take a break during cleans, front and overhead squats or snatches (I’m fairly certain this is responsible for most cases of “crossfit shoulder”).  Aside from the ridiculous tissue stress this poor positioning puts on the joints and their respective connective tissue (ligaments and cartilage), the muscles aren’t at their optimal position either.  When muscles are shortened or lengthened from where they should be they surrender proper force generation due to the sub-optimal overlapping of your actin and myosin (the tiny proteins in muscle responsible for pulling your muscles shorter or “flexing”).  So in short, being in this position makes you weaker than you could be, AND compensating for poor biomechanics in the shoulder with poor motion in the elbows and wrists is a recipe for injury.

Finally… Guys, your traps aren’t that big, I’m sorry… and Girls, believe it or not, this applies to you too.

Everyone knows the guy that errs into the dreaded D-bag shoulder position for the purpose of trying to look “huge”, or “yoked”.  The poor shoulder position and increased kyphosis (humping/rounding of the thoracic spine) it takes to achieve the appearance of larger traps is ultimately going to be more work and more dangerous than working toward a 300 pound clean and 500 pound deadlift.  The ladies don’t like it, and your chiropractor will cringe and have nightmares.  So please, if your pulled into this poor position, make it for reasons (you work at a desk 8 hours a day to make money to live, you just happened to always do front based exercises, etc.) other than because you want to look “cool”.

Now then, for the ladies, I know you’re worried you’re going to get “those neck muscles” if you lift heavy.  Doesn’t the fact that there are guys out there compromising their morals (and more importantly, their posture!) for the sake of growing some big traps, convince you at all, that they might be difficult to grow?  Secondly, if you are worried about having the appearance of large traps, and you aren’t doing mobility work to open up your thoracic extension and pull those shoulder back, I’m going to have a hard time feeling sorry for you.  They aren’t large muscles and they won’t look large if you achieve better posture and positioning.  Make it a priority.

So let’s achieve some good quality shoulder position so that we can all function better, hit PRs without injury and even look better.  I will make another post shortly about what you can do to help reverse this pandemic, until then, feel free to ask myself, Annie, Lisa, Joseph, Alex or Rachael how to start the process.

 

Cheers!  And Happy lifting!

Dr. Adam Ball

Wild animals are healthy animals

 

Over/through a small stream, climbing up rocks, and I'm the tiny speck in the bottom right area. Milford Sound, New Zealand.

Humans are animals.  You know I’ve spoken about this before.  But I think we need to revisit this idea on a regular basis.

John Durant of Hunter-Gatherer.com, made a recent post with a news story about two gorillas living in a zoo in Cleveland.  According to the news story, the leading cause of death of gorillas living in zoos, is heart disease.  (Side Bar:  It would be interesting to see the cause of death of every species that lives in a zoo and is “fed” according to what we think they should eat).  Does this blast anyone else’s mind?  How many wild gorillas are dying of heart disease?  I’m willing to bet, that much like wild humans, the number of wild gorillas dying of heart disease is zero.  Why is this happening?

Even more surprising about the news story, is that someone was around to say, “Hey, why don’t we try feeding the gorillas the types of food they’d actually eat?”  Looks like the world hasn’t gone completely mad yet.  Thank goodness.  So, what did they find when the gorillas transitioned to eating genetically congruent foods?  The apes got healthier.  Their markers for heart disease decreased.  But that’s not all!  What else happened?  They stopped acting weird.  The behaviors that are typical of captive gorillas (vomiting foods back up and eating them again, pulling out their hair and eating it) started to disappear (wild gorillas apparently do not do this stuff… could this be gorilla indigestion?) and they started acting like wild gorillas again.  Amazing.

So to sum things up, when gorillas eat a diet they’re supposed to eat, they not only get healthier in regards to their heart health, but mental health improves, they achieve a healthier body composition and, I assume, they’re much happier.

Can we please step back and see ourselves as the animals that we are right now?  Take a look at a phylogenetic tree.  Homo sapiens are not too far away from chimpanzees, orangutangs, and even gorillas.  So why are we NOT asking the same questions about human health?  Humans are dying all day everyday for the exact same reason (heart disease, among many other chronic diseases).  We’re eating foods we are not designed to eat, we’re moving in ways we are not supposed to move, and our social interactions are moving further and further away from normal (remember life before the internet?).

Erwan Le Corre of Movnat.com  is building a legacy.  I hope that in the future, he wins the Nobel Prize.  If we can learn from him, build on the principles of MovNat and shape our communities and societies around those principles, we will regain the health we’re designed for.  We can return to being the species that deserves to be at the top of the food chain.  Right now, we are the sickest species on the planet.  We need to figure out how normal humans live, and we need to get back to that as much as we can.  We need to emulate it.  I’m not asking you to stop using a toilet, or to throw away your computer and all your cherished belongings.  There are advantages to having permanent dwellings, electricity and many other benefits of modern living.  What I AM asking you to do is think about how you eat, move and think.

Eat a human diet:

  • What would you eat if you were thrown out into the wild?
  • Would you avoid killing and eating even the small creatures you could find, because it’s immoral and “bad for you”?
  • Would you try to find the fields of wild grains, so that you can pick hundreds of thousands of tiny seeds, find some stones to grind them one, and some water to hold the powder together and then create a fire so that you can somehoe fry the mush that is created from all your efforts?
  • Would you look for fruits and veggies that look, smell and taste edible?
  • Would you kill and eat every possibly edible part of an animal, or would you throw away the organs because they’re “gross” and go hungry?

Move like humans are meant to move:

  • I’m not going to write a lot here, but MovNat would be ideal
  • Crossfit is a close second, when done properly – This is a good example of using modern tools to achieve/supplement natural movement patterns

Think like humans are meant to think:

  • Isn’t it weird that instead of speaking with each other there is more online communication than ever before?  IMs, texts, emails, blogs (yes, I realize I’m criticizing myself), etc.
  • We have more depression, ADD, ADHD, autism, anxiety and just about every other mental disorder there is than any other time in history.
  • There are a lot of venues where negative is funny.  This I have a particular peeve with.
  • Feeling love, trust and respect is dying it seems – let’s not let that happen.

I feel like we’re making changes slowly.  MovNat is becoming more popular, as well as many other similar pursuits from other like-minded people.  People are becoming fed up with conventional wisdoms’ ideas about health and what the next new superfood/exercise program will save us from ourselves.  There is nothing new we need learn to take action.  We just need to look at healthy people and see what they’re doing.  I’ll end this post with a quote you’ve probably seen before, “Nothing in Biology makes sense except in light of evolution.” – Theodosius Dobzhansky

Cheers Folks!

Dr. Adam Ball

When the pain isn’t because of the pain…

But it doesn’t make sense – How could the pain you’re feeling NOT be due to the pain?  Well… it’s because you can’t feel movement.

I’d always learned and read this in school, but sometimes a “refresher” is nice.  I recently read a journal article that did that for me (Changes in Aβ non-nociceptive primary sensory neurons in a rat model of osteoarthritis pain [Molecular Pain 2010, 6:37]).  Unfortunately, journal articles can be a pain to read.  You need to look through the authors opinions, crappy statistical analysis, misreporting, etc.  Anyway, that’s not what today’s post is about…

So what was the article about?

  • The authors had mice that were either “normal” (not surgically injured) and those who were given osteoarthritis (surgical removal of medial meniscus and partial removal of the ACL in the knee)
  • Time was passed and osteoarthritis developed in those rats with the surgical injuries (poor little guys)
  • The authors then tested the rats neural pathways for nociception (pain) and mechanoreception (proprioception – range of motion/body sense/knowing where you are in space)

So what did they find?  (all results are in comparison to the healthy, happy rats)

  • The injured rats were much more quick to react to stimuli that would not normally perceived as pain (they were very sensitive to stimuli that could eventually be painful – think poking the back of your hand lightly with a toothpick versus pushing it into your skin)
  • The resting potential of nerves responsible for the perception of pain were closer to depolarizing than control rats (this means less stimuli is required for these rats to experience pain)
  • Conversely, the mechanoreceptors were further from depolarizing in the injured rats (this means they weren’t just not moving as much, their movement wasn’t being recognized by the brain as much

Why does this matter to you?

Like I’ve said before, movement and pain are competitive inhibitors, meaning they cancel each other out.  This is often responsible for the good feeling you have after exercising (outside of the hormonal response) and chiropractic.  Chiropractic being the donor of full, accessible, pain-inhibiting range of motion signals to your brain.

But those mice have arthritis and I don’t!

Maybe.  Not to be a debbie downer, but most people have knee/elbow/shoulder/wrist/low back pain that isn’t really pain per se, but is inconvenient or annoying.  That’s the very early stages of osteoarthritis, unless the reason you’re having that recurring problem (posture, movement patterns, etc.) is remedied.  Besides, wouldn’t you want your brain and joints to benefit from a full range of motion?

So, as per usual my recommendations are:  See a chiropractor, exercise intelligently with regularity, eat real foods that were designed for you, and de-stress in a regular basis.

All the best folks!

Dr. Ball

p.s. If you’re in the Oakville or Mississauga areas, come in and see me!  I’m located at Element Crossfit and I’m there Monday through Friday.  Cheers!  Click here to book an appointment with me or give me a call at (647) 268-4703.

Why Chiropractic? – Part 2, or I’m Freaking out Man!

Hey Folks!  We’re back with Part Deux of the “How Chiropractic will change your life” Saga.  The last post ended with quite the cliffhanger – What are the far reaching effects of stress and how is Chiro involved with it?

Relaxing on the water

A good defence for the stress response - relaxing at the cottage

You may remember in a previous post I mentioned that movement and pain are competitive inhibitors, meaning one cancels the other out.  The slightly more complicated version of this idea is that painful things (repetitive motions/poor posture) are always sent to the brain, but only some are ultimately perceived as pain (like face-planting off a BMX).  What DOES happen before the realization of pain is the stress response, which you may know as the fight/flight response.  So while sitting in a chair writing a blog post will fire up some nociception (pain) from my spine, the “pain” isn’t a conscious event.  Without chiropractic adjustments, subluxations continue to reduce the movement signal being sent to the brain and increase the painful/stress signal being sent.  This wouldn’t be a problem, except that all these stressors and the chronic stress response they set up in your body is a cumulative thing.  So eventually you end up feeling pain from trivial stimuli that normally wouldn’t be perceived as painful (some researchers/scientists believe this may be involved in the development of fibromyalgia).

The stress response affects the nervous input to your brain and the effect is the brain then doesn’t know how to optimally respond to its’ environment.  This results in changes in your bodies many balancing acts (blood pressure/cardiac output, hormone production, everything, etc.), emotions (ever feel more relaxed or more energized after an adjustment?), visceral function (better breathing, digestion, etc.) as well as the more obvious changes in movement, muscle tone and posture (notice good posture is less work after an adjustment?).

You may have heard the stress response being explained with this analogy:

You’re out in the wild, and you’ve been there 100 times before and you’re going down to the stream to get some water, you check out your surroundings and everything is great.  You dip your hands into the water but hear something and quickly turn around and there is a tiger about 15 feet away from you in full sprint/attack mode.  You don’t take the time to consider whether or not it’s actually planning on running past you because it’s just REALLY thirsty.  Your body reacts and you either try to fight it (and get mauled to death) or you run for your life (and probably, you get mauled to death – tigers are fast).  But what happens inside of you during all of this?  The stress response.

If you’re like me in 2nd year Biology, that’s just about all you remember about it.  So now let’s talk about what actually happens during the stress response.  Every process that will increase the available energy to your muscles (catabolic processes) happens (blood flow to your organs slows [vasoconstriction], blood flow to your muscles increases [vasodilation], heart rate increases) and everything your body does that you don’t necessarily NEED at this very moment (anabolic processes) is decreased (Sex glands, sex drive, digestion, growth/repair, immunity).  This is intelligent as we probably aren’t worried about our sex performance when being mauled to death is imminent.  The other thing that happens is that our awareness is increased (so we can see where to run away to, any possible weapons nearby, etc.) at the expense of concentration (sounds like ADHD, doesn’t it? – maybe these kids are stressed out!).  We don’t need to learn the stress response while fleeing, so we don’t.

So, as you can imagine, people who are chronically stressed (be it from subluxation, poor diet or mental stress) may be the same people suffering from:  High blood pressure, decreased fertility, decreased libido, IBS, indigestion, colds/flu/chronic bronchitis, poor recovery from sickness OR workouts, poor concentration.  Your body creates the stress response so that you can change your environment.  As modern humans our problem is that many of us expose ourselves to this environment EVERYDAY.

Now then, you now have a pretty good idea (probably better than many healthcare professionals) about why the stress response is bad.  You’ve got a good idea about its’ far reaching effects (no sex drive?  No thank you!) and later this week, you’ll get a good idea about how to reduce it/resolve these problems (although you’ve probably got a good idea what I’m going to hint at!)

Cheers Folks!

Dr. Adam Ball

Why Chiropractic? or Where did these demons in my spine come from?

Why Chiropractic?

Hey Folks, time for another awesome blog post about the best thing since sliced back bacon… Chiropractic!

A common question I receive from the non-chiropractor-seeing population (and sometimes from the chiropractor-visiting population as well) is “Why do I need to see a chiropractor?”

Have a seat, (with good posture, of course) this may take a while…

This guy can exorcise the demons in your spine.

Chiropractic operates under a different paradigm than medicine.  This wouldn’t be a problem if it weren’t for the fact that the only health care model that most of us are exposed to from birth onwards is the medical model.  Many folks never see a chiropractor in their lifetime (a single tear rolls down my cheek for those people).  Even then, some who DO see a chiro never learn about our paradigm as sometimes it’s just easier to try and fit chiropractic into the medical model.  To really understand WHY you should visit a chiropractor, we need to delve deeper into the chiropractic wellness paradigm.

Here’s the gist of our model:  Aside from some (very few) exceptions, we all share the same genetics that are designed to express health.  Unless you believe that absolutely everything you do is preordained, you have to believe that the choices you make in life have an impact on it.  I’m here to tell you that provided the right environment (created by your choices), your body (and its’ genetics) have no choice but to make you healthy, happy and wealthy (ok, maybe not wealthy).  So when we think about our health in this light, it’s our choices that determine how healthy we are.  There are no tricks, no hacks and no shortcuts (Sorry, Tim Ferriss).

“Life is hard!”

I’m not a fan of that saying at all.  Life isn’t hard, life is awesome.  Life can however, lead to misalignment/motion restrictions/problems with your spine and its’ joints.  Some chiropractors like to call these problems, “subluxations”.  I personally don’t care what you want to call them, I just want your spine moving better.  Like avoiding exercise and eating junk, having these adaptations (subluxations) in your spine is a bad thing.  Subluxations can be caused by traumas in the large sense, like being born, being hit by a car/linebacker or falling off a ladder.  They can also be caused from small incremental things, like poor posture, sitting too much and repetitive motions.  Toxins like gluten, heavy metals, allergenic substances (depending on your allergies) can cause them as well as things as simple as stress (just think about your posture in a stressful situation… not good).  As you can imagine, this means living life can frequently lead to these problems in your spine.

“But then I would have them ALL the time!”

False.  We’re humans.  Anyone who’s ever dropped a baby knows that we’re designed to be resilient.  A baby can recover from a small drop but if the baby falls from a decent height or you start dribbling the baby like a basketball there might be some problems.  A simple and effective way to think about these causes of subluxation, is as stressors.  Stress is a stressor (D’uh?), but so is gluten, too much sitting and taking a line drive to the solar plexus (I’ve always wanted to use that in a sentence).  Pain is also a stressor.  The effects of these stressors are FAR reaching and reducing/eliminating them is responsible for the far reaching effects of chiropractic.  I will get into this in more detail next post, as your attention span is most likely fried by now.

Cheers!

Dr. Adam Ball

P.s. I’m on Twitter and Facebook these days.  Now you can comment here, send me a message or heckle me on my wall.  Either way, I love hearing from you guys!

What is Health?

The following post was written by Dr. Adam Blair.  He is practicing chiropractic in Pickering, Ontario and his contact information is available at the end of this post.  I highly recommend Dr. Blair and have had many of my occasional problems solved by his work.  Onto the post!


If you were to ask one hundred people what their definition of health was, you would likely get one hundred different answers- which is likely the reason you will never see the question asked on Family Feud.  Luckily, I’m here to provide you with a concrete foundation upon which you can begin to contemplate and construct your own definition of health. First I will dispel the myth that health is simply the absence of disease. If it were so simple, only two extreme possibilities could exist: you’re either healthy, or you’re sick. In reality, a person’s health exists along a much more complicated continuum. Let’s explore…

Everything you experience between the day you are born and the day you die, you experience through your nervous system. This being true, it is safe to say that you essentially live through your nervous system. Think about it. Sight, smell, taste, touch and hearing – your five senses and each one is integrated and interpreted through your nervous system.

When you get sick, you do not need to consciously tell your immune system to wake up and get to work. In fact, your body is miles ahead of you. By the time you begin to experience even the slightest symptoms, your immune system has been activated and is working to eliminate any pathogens that have been introduced into your system.  No conscious thought. No drugs. No surgery.
When you exercise, and the demand for blood to the muscles and oxygen to the blood increases you don’t sit down, get in touch with your cardiopulmonary system and politely ask it to provide you with some additional blood and oxygen.  Again, your body is ahead of the game. It has already increased blood flow by increasing heart rate and decreasing resistance within the vessels and increased oxygen intake by increasing respiratory rate.

When you cut yourself and you cover that cut up with a Band-Aid, it’s the Band-Aid that is responsible for healing the cut….. right? False. Once again your body instinctively knows what needs to be done, and a set of complex biochemical events takes place in a closely orchestrated cascade to repair the damage.

So, we have discovered two distinct facts: one – that the nervous system controls everything and two -that your body is self-regulating and self-healing.  We are also going to go so far as to suggest that if we can ensure that fact number one is working as efficiently as possible, fact number two will also occur at optimal efficiency.  In other words, if the nervous system is free of stress (physical, chemical, and/or emotional) it is in an ideal state to ensure that everything in the body functions as it should. And this is the basis for our definition of health.

Our body’s are in a constant effort to achieve a state of balance.  We want to find a level of homeostasis (really homeodynamics  -but that is a discussion for another time) between the components of our autonomic nervous system. The idea in itself seems easy enough to accomplish.  However, our typical lifestyles (which are filled with stress) tend to tip the scales and cause an overactivation of our sympathetic nervous system.  This constant stressful state (your sympathetic nervous system is responsible for the fight/flight response) makes it much more difficult for the body to respond efficiently to the outside stressors that it is subjected to on a daily basis. These stressors can be of the physical (sports, physical labour, etc), emotional (grief, relationships, work) and/or chemical (dietary, environmental, medications, smoking, etc) variety, and prolonged exposure without intervention can lead to the deterioration of a person’s health. If you or someone you know are trying to quit smoking then consider switching to vape pens. They will help ease you into quitting and is a much more healthier alternative.

Stress is a cumulative event, and the body is capable of handling stressors when the nervous system is functioning as it is meant to. However, as the nervous system endures this constant bombardment from various stressors, the body begins to shift from a state of balance to a state of fatigue and guarding. This shift is a defensive reaction, and can manifest as alterations in muscle tone. It is logical to deduce that altered muscle function can (and will) lead to joint dysfunction. Joint dysfunction will lead to degeneration which will only add to the stress already placed upon the nervous system to function efficiently. The longer this dysfunction is allowed to continue without intervention, the more difficult it becomes to return the muscles, joints and nervous system to a state of balance.
The nervous system is intelligent to a fault. When the body becomes accustomed to performing certain movements and postures it begins to accept these as ‘natural’. Yet there is nothing natural about sitting in a chair in front of a computer or hauling skids off of a truck for 8 hours a day. We are simply not designed with these actions and postural tendencies in mind. The body adapts to these learned tendencies with alterations in structure (tighter, weaker muscles), while structure is undeniably related to (dys)function.  Most people assume that if anything unpleasant was happening within their body that they would realize it via discomfort or pain. False again.

It is common for early joint dysfunction to exist without any significant pain or discomfort.  In fact, only approximately 10% of nociception (the neural processes of encoding and processing noxious or unpleasant stimuli) is experienced as pain.  Just because you don’t have pain doesn’t mean you aren’t experiencing any structural or functional deficiencies. Waiting for pain to present actually leads to a longer path towards recovery, rehabilitation, rehabituation and restoration of health.

It would make sense at this point to delve a little further into chiropractic’s role in all of this.  As chiropractors we have a massive variety of tools and techniques that we can use to provide the service that makes us unique – the adjustment. Some techniques work for some doctors and not others. Patients are the same in that one person may prefer one technique while another prefers an alternative. What most techniques have in common (including those that I utilize) is that they are gentle, safe, and comfortable for the patient. A common misconception is that every adjustment is accompanied by a ‘crack’ (which in actuality is no different that the hiss you hear when you open a bottle of pop for the first time – the sound is nothing more than gas being released from within the joint). In reality, there are numerous techniques that are even less invasive and utilize highly specific, low force methods rather than a hands-on approach. Really, there is something for everybody! Another commonality is that these techniques are used to correct mechanical joint dysfunction, reduce nerve interference and neural tension by restoring proper motion to joints and re-educating the nervous system to function efficiently. And we know from earlier that an efficient, stress-accomodating (balanced) nervous system is a healthy nervous system. And a healthy nervous system optimizes a person’s potential for health.  As the nerves, muscles and joints begin to adapt and memorize the corrective changes being introduced via the adjustment, they begin to revert back to their truly natural state. Chiropractic’s role is to unwind existing patterns of mechanical dysfunction and nerve interference so that we can help you rebuild a healthier way of life. In this respect, chiropractic should not be viewed as a therapy, but rather as a lifestyle.

Now, since I only intended for this post to be a paragraph or three long, I’m going to step away from the laptop for now. However, if anyone has any questions regarding anything I have touched on please feel free to contact me. You can email me @ drblair@fletcherchiropractic.ca . I am currently accepting new patients, and if you would like to come in for a complimentary consult you can make an appointment by calling 905-831-9696.

Dr. Blair