Only when you know the question, will you know what the answer means

42.

The answer to life, the universe, and everything.

I’ve used this joke a lot, but I’m about to be a Dad, so get used to me re-using jokes.  I think that’s part of becoming a Dad.  That, and I can rarely think of a better way to exemplify what I’m trying to say when I come across broad, over-arching answers.

This topic tends to come up with me one of two ways:

  • I’m making fun of something that is being touted as the new answer to everything (or is being advertised that way to do one thing… get you to buy and consume whatever it is).
    • My call for this year is tea.  No one particular tea, but ones with cool names in general, not the “normal” teas we’re used to seeing (like orange pekoe, earl grey or english breakfast), but the exotic sounding ones, like matcha, yerba maté, and other crazy stuff that might not even be tea but is being sold that way because we don’t know how else to conceptualize it otherwise.
  • I’m trying to explain the “Wellness and Lifestyle” model of healthcare.  Which, if we’re watching the slow decline of society into chronic illness, and chronic illness management, we desperately need.

Todays post is the latter of those two options.  Reading through research lately has been fun/tedious, but every once in a while you come across something seriously awesome.  I’m embarrassed I haven’t come across this sooner, to be honest.  but here it is:

Is it possible to have TOO much Nrf2? Stay Tuned... (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Steve Cushman/Released)

Is it possible to have TOO much Nrf2? Stay Tuned… (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Steve Cushman/Released)

Nrf2, a master regulator of detoxification and also antioxidant, antiinflammatory and other cytoprotective mechanisms, is raised by health promoting factors

This article is simply awesome.  Here is laypersons summary of their abstract:

  • Nrf2 is short for nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (yeah… Nerf 2 is a little easier to say/reference)
  • It’s a “transcription factor”, meaning it leads cells to “read” certain parts of our DNA and causes certain physiological cascades afterwards.
    • And this one activates the transcription of over 500 genes!
  • Things that it does:
    • detoxifies the body of molecules that can be toxic when accumulated to unhealthy levels as well as toxic metals
    • Anti-oxidant activities (reduces “bad” oxidation of molecules that can lead to mutations, aging, or unnecessary waste)
    • Produces anti-inflammatory changes (think, Advil, or fish oil)
    • Stimulates the creation of new mitochondria, and improves the function of already existing mitochondria (think, more energy, easier)
    • Stimulates autophagy – a cleaner for your cells, that gets rid of “trash” that can be problematic if not kept under control
  • Things that increase our amount of Nrf2:
    • Phenolic antioxidants, like plants, herbs and (wait for it…) tea
    • gamma and delta-tocopherols, tocotrienols.  Vitamin E – healthy fats, olive oil, avocado, etc.
    • Long chain Omega 3 fats EPA and DHA – from fish, krill, squid, grass-fed meats, etc.
    • Carotenoids like lycopene (in tomatoes and grapes)
    • isothiacynates from cruciferous vegetables (kale, spinach, broccoli, etc.)
    • Sulphur compounds from allium vegetables (garlic, onions, shallots, etc.)
    • Terpenoids (herbs like cinnamon and ginger)
    • Low level oxidative stress (low intensity exercise, like walking)
    • More intense exercise
    • Fasting/Caloric restriction
  • Chronic Inflammatory Diseases that are prevented/treated by increasing Nrf2?
    • cardiovascular diseases
    • kidney diseases
    • lung diseases
    • Diseases of toxic liver damage
    • Cancer [prevention]
    • Diabetes/Metabolic Syndrome/Obesity
    • Sepsis
    • Autoimmune diseases
    • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Epilepsy
    • lesser evidence also points to the improvement of 16 other diseases

Sounds pretty impressive eh?  I like part of the conclusion, “Nrf2 is argued to be both lifespan and health span extending.” [emphasis mine]  FINALLY a focus on not just increasing the length of our lives, but also the quality of those years.

Get out for a hike for some low intensity restorative exercise!

Get out for a hike for some low intensity restorative exercise!

The authors also speak to the potential of having TOO much Nrf2 (which is smart to hopefully nip the “if some is good, let’s crank the knob up to 11!” bud), as it can cause a type of acne in certain cases, and more life-threatening risks in very extreme situations (in mice with a gene removed from their body that would regulate Nrf2, so it just continues to accumulate).  So it DOES NOT follow a, “if some is good, more is better” model either.  Very interesting… Almost like all those things that improve it should be employed, but not to excess.

News Flash – Being reasonable is healthy.

So if we want to improve our bodies detoxification pathways (which are a real thing, that your liver and kidneys help with), tidy up our cells, improve our mitochondrial health and generally improve our lives doing the things that help improve this particular transcription factor is not a bad idea.  What are those things?

  • Eat a diet rich in vegetables, fruit (of various colours and textures) and quality meats and fats
  • Use some herbs and spices to make your food a bit more interesting
  • Consider supplementing with a modest amount of Omega 3 fats from high quality sources
  • Move your body at a low, steady pace, most of the time.  Then at a hard pace every once in a while.
  • Avoid overeating, and maybe consider fasting or taking on the mindset from Okinawa of “Hara Hachi Bu” – meaning to eat only until you’re 80% full

Stay Healthy Friends!

Dr. Adam Ball

Increasing ability versus decreasing disability

Hey Folks!

I am a healthcare practitioner that specializes in movement, nutrition and wellness.  My job is making people better.  That’s a very subjective goal, but it’s a crucial goal for sure.  Many people live their lives simply hoping they don’t encounter illness or disability.  Many hope it won’t “get” them.  I’m here to tell you, you can do more than hope.

In my practice I help people perform better.  I also help people experience less pain.  Some simply prefer to experience less pain and are happy with that much progress (it’s an easy progress indicator to gauge).  I’ve often been heard saying the perfect time to see a Chiropractor is 1 day before you start to notice any symptoms (whether they be as obvious as pain, or as subtle as less quality sleep or digestion).  This is a difficult goal – and in my opinion isn’t one we need to be concerned with.  So why do I use that example then?  Well…

Do we only eat well until we notice a change, and then stop and wait for the change to go away before eating well again?  Do we only go to the dentist when the pain is so bad we can’t handle it, then wait until that happens again to return?  How about learning piano or guitar – do we learn how to strum a couple chords and then stop, wait until we forget how, then re-learn, hoping to one day flawlessly perform “stairway to heaven”?  Or do we KNOW that it takes more diligence, more work, and more awareness than that?

Then why do we treat our spines (and therefore our nervous system) that way?  We go to the Chiropractor, and then don’t return until we’re in so much pain we can’t tie our own shoelaces.  It’s time to take some initiative and improve our situation.  It’s time to start taking the “moving well” out of eating, moving and thinking well a little more seriously.  Being in the gym is one way to do that.  Seeing a Chiropractor is the other.  They do not replace each other and both are crucial.

I’ve read literature showing Chiropractic improves high jumping, judo athletes grip strength, blood pressure, insulin sensitivity, our ability to withstand mental stress, and obviously, our range of motion (and therefore how our body moves).  It’s inspiring and frustrating (chiropractic controlled trials are hard to perform and therefore are hard to come across).  Once you’ve read the literature and learned the physiological mechanisms for said changes, it makes sense.

This is how most perceive Chiropractic works:

Chiro Dx

This is what actually happens:

Subluxation and Adjustment diagram 

–       Courtesy of James Chestnut DC CCWP

So, the effect goes from the joint, all the way up to the brain.  It communicates and moves on to numerous other structures in the nervous system and eventually the body.  So along with the improvement in how the joint is moving we experience lowered stress levels, improvements in heart health measurements (cholesterol, blood pressure, heart rate, vasodilation to the organs, etc.), a greater ability to learn (improved concentration), and tons of other benefits – all because your joints are moving the way they should be.

I’ve seen countless people come in grouchy, and leave far happier.  I’ve seen that happen on the Chiropractic table and I’ve seen it happen after training in the gym.  It comes from activating movement-pleasure pathways from the joints, to the brain.  When you receive that message through exercise, it is far more “clear” if your spine has access to its’ full range of motion.  Chiropractors (and some other manual therapists) are experts at providing you that range of motion.  The frequency with which you can benefit from an adjustment could be as little as once a week (after an initial phase of care), or as infrequent as once every 6 weeks.  Gauge your performance, your sleep, your digestion, your range of motion and even your mental clarity and mood – they’re all indications of your health status, and how your body is treating you.  It takes some trial and error, but you’ll find a frequency that works well for you.  For most living a fairly healthy lifestyle, this ends up being once every 2 weeks to once every 4 weeks.

For everything in life (and health) we live in a dynamic balance.  When we get cold we shiver, when we’re warm we sweat, when exercise or stress demands it, we raise our blood pressure.  Everything has a reason and everything has an effect.  Our ability to accommodate and then recover from stressors best demonstrates our level of health.  Chiropractic adjustments help us to address, and recover from the demands of our environment.

So as much as I love seeing people go from grimace to smile, I enjoy even more hearing that people are sleeping well, loving life and performing well at their hobbies.  Take care of yourself.  Eat well.  Spend time with your loved ones.  Exercise with purpose.  And see your Chiropractor.  Don’t live life from back twinge to back twinge – let me help you go from good to great – It would be my pleasure.

In health,

Dr. Adam Ball
BHSc MScACN DC NMC

If you’d like to book an appointment yourself, Click Here.  If you’d like to speak with me, send me an email through the contact form, or call the office at (705) 222-7213.

Research of the Day – Nov 22, 2012 – Fish versus Anxiety… Who wins???

Hey Folks!

Research of the Day!

Today’s Article:

Omega-3 Supplementation Lowers Inflammation and Anxiety in Medical Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial

What they did:

  • Split a group of medical school students up into groups that received either ~2.3g of EPA + DHA per day, or some capsules containing ~2.3g of a mixture of palm, olive, soy, canola and cocoa butter oils (to mimic the average fatty acid intake in western diets).
  • They then took their blood 6 times throughout the 12 week intervention, once during a non stressful time and right before an exam (high stress time) without any supplementation and then twice again AFTER supplementation (or fake supplementation) right before a major exam, or during a less stressful time (beginning of a new semester, with many weeks until an exam, etc.)
  • They performed physicals at the beginning and end of the study that also included measurements of central adiposity (fat around the waistline), a food frequency questionnaire, a measure of sleep quality, a measure of physical activity, and a health review (to ask if the person had been sick at all, etc. over the last 12 weeks)
  • They performed two other tests to screen for depressive symptoms as well as symptoms of anxiety (as they are not the same) at each of the 6 visits
  • THey collected blood from the subjects at each visit to test them for their fatty acid profiles
  • They also checked for inflammatory biomarkers (IL-6 and TNF-alpha)

What happened:

  • EPA and DHA in plasma and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells increased significantly in the supplemented group
  • IL-6 and TNF-alpha were lower in the treatment group versus control after supplementation, but not to a significant degree
  • Anxiety, but not depression was reduced in the treatment group over the control group relatively by 20% (We are reminded that all subjects are healthy, young volunteers, that had low anxiety scores to begin with… although there was still a reduction in the treatment group)
  • They took ALL the blood samples and checked their omega 6: omega 3 ratio to check for correlations with inflammatory markers and anxiety scores and found an inverse relationship

So what’s going on?

  • Supplementing with ~2.3g of EPA + DHA was associated with increases in their concentrations in plasma and in percipheral blood cells
  • This increase correlated with improved omega 6: omega 3 ratios
  • improvements in that ratio meant less inflammation at rest as well as less inflammation when inflammation was stimulated
  • Improvements in that ratio ALSO correlated well with less symptoms of anxiety at rest and during high stress environments (medical exams, in this case)

And thennnn:

  • I’m really glad they checked the Omega 6: omega 3 ratio… it was a smart move
  • It shows that you can’t cover up a crap diet with fish oil (the ratio probably wouldn’t have changed in this case), and that when you create sufficiency where deficiency exists AKA Improve that ratio, good things happen
  • The students weren’t overly concerned with ameliorating symptoms, other than maybe hoping to feel a little less stressed during exams and the fish oil has the potential to lower inflammation and reduce anxiety levels

Take away, Fish oil isn’t something you take to fix this problem, or cure that illness; You take it to create balance in your body and to provide the proper building blocks for health. No one is going to disagree that less baseline inflammation and less inflammation during stressful environments is a bad thing.

If you need some fish oil, and you all do (unless you already are taking some), ask me in the clinic OR at the gym – I have some of the best quality you can find available for a great price $42 for approximately 100 servings. That’s less than 50 cents a day to make a difference in your inflammatory pathways as well as to reduce any resting anxiety. If I can help you out let me know!

Stay Healthy Friends!

Dr. Adam Ball

p.s. As usual, if you’d like to book an appointment for Chiropractic Wellness & Lifestyle care, book an appointment here, or call me at (705) 586-7873

Research of the Day – Nov 21, 2012 – Wheat. It doesn’t just affect your belly…

Hey Folks!

Yeah, I didn’t post a “research of the day” yesterday. Turns out it’s far easier to read studies than it is to read them AND write about/summarize them. Oh well!

Today’s Article:

Improved Xenobiotic Metabolism and Reduced Susceptibility to Cancer in Gluten-Sensitive Macaques upon Introduction of a Gluten-Free Diet

What they did:

  • Took macaques and found 4 that were sensitive to gluten and 4 that didn’t appear to be sensitive to gluten
  • Fed them a gluten containing diet, and a gluten free diet – 10 weeks each
  • Measured changes in gene expression as well as in antibodies associated with gluten ingestion
  • Tried to relate the genes being expressed to their functions and make inferences as to why certain genes were being expressed while others weren’t

What happened:

  • The gluten sensitive macaques showed an antibody response to the gluten containing diet in the the form of anti-gliadin-antibody (AGA) and transglutaminase-2 antibodies (TG2) – Which frequently show up in those with Celiac Disease (in the human population)
  • There was a significant difference in the expression of genes when the macaques were fed gluten containing diets
  • They were labelled as important (due to previous studies making associations between certain genes and certain health outcomes) to cancer formation, a reduced ability to detoxify, and decreased actin and collagen producing mechanisms (to help with scar tissue formation, possibly)
  • They were right – Genes associated with killing cancer cells were down-regulated, those associated with sustaining life in cancer cells were up-regulated, detoxifying genes were down-regulated, as were the actin and collagen producing genes.
  • The macaques each took different amount of time to heal from the exposure to gluten, and 1 of the 4 was still not back to “baseline” gene expression after the 10 weeks.

Take away info:

  • HUGELY IMPORTANT – The genes are NOT responsible for the illnesses associated with them. Sure, it’s nice to label them “oh this ones the cancer gene, THAT one is the autism gene”, but really… they’re just genes, and when are they expressed??? When we live in a way that causes their expression. I feel like this study gets slanted toward genetics research as a LOT of the writing is about the genes, but they’re only being expressed because we are changing the ENVIRONMENT. Those “illness” genes weren’t being expressed until we presented the macaques with a toxic and deficient environment (the gluten containing diet).
  • Imagine a 3rd group – macaques living in the wild, eating, moving and thinking in ways wild, healthy, natural macaques do. Compare those macaques to the “healthy” macaques and see the difference in THEIR gene expression. I’m willing to bet it’d be a difference like night and day.
  • Gluten doesn’t JUST upset your stomach. It increases your chances for cancer and pretty much every other chronic illness associated with inflammation – THIS IS A BIG DEAL
  • Even the “healthy” macaques (the ones not sensitive, had more favourable gene expression on the gluten free diet)
  • We can’t CHANGE our genes, and while differences occur between how intensely one person reacts versus another to things like gluten doesn’t ultimately matter as gluten isn’t beneficial to ANYONE. Gluten didn’t help the “healthy” macaques, it just affected them less negatively.

It’s time to stop living “less bad” and start pursuing greater health. Avoiding gluten made the healthy macaques healthier, just not at as significant a level. We need MORE HEALTH, not less sickness… we’ve been trying to make less sickness for a long time and it hasn’t gotten us very far.

Have a great day and Stay Healthy, Friends!

Dr. Adam Ball

Once again, for anyone interested in booking an appointment with me for Chiropractic Wellness & Lifestyle care, book here or call (705) 586-7873

Research of the Day – Nov 19, 2012 – Colic & Chiro, they go together like bacon and just about anything…

Hey Folks!

I took the weekend off – My brother and Sister-in-law were up to visit so I had more fun things to do.

Todays article

Efficacy of Chiropractic Manual Therapy on Infant Colic: A Pragmatic Single-Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial

I don’t have the full text (yet), but I couldn’t rob you of this one…

What they did:

  • Split groups of babies into 1 – Treated and the parents knew, 2 – Treated and the parents DIDN’T know, 3 – not treated and the parents knew
  • I’m not sure why they didn’t include the fourth group (something the full text would elucidate I’m sure…) but oh well
  • Followed up with parents to see if there was any less crying in the colicky babies
  • A significant amount of less crying was quantified as 2 hours less
  • The two treatment groups were made to see if results were based on parents thinking their child got better because they were treated versus them actually being better

What they found:

  • The treated babies cried significantly less than the un-treated babies regardless of whether the parents observed the treatment or not.

What does it mean:

  • It suggests Chiropractic care may help with Colic in infants. Total time spent crying was reduced, which I’m sure would mean a lot to parents.
  • The results were not based on the parents hoping their children were better as even the parents who didn’t know their child was treated or not (but they were) reported less crying.

And so:

  • Chiropractic care with infants is extremely gentle, very low force and not what most would think of when they consider “Chiropractic care”
  • Ensuring proper movement in the spine and therefore better communication between brain and body in infants is less invasive and far more safe an intervention than drugs or surgery to prevent colic
  • I don’t have the full study, I don’t have children, and I’m a Chiropractor (and therefore have built in bias that can’t be avoided) but I believe Chiropractic care for infants should be the mandatory first step in addressing Colic (among other physiological perturbations) in children as it is the least invasive and introduces nothing novel into the digestive tract or blood supply of the infant.
  • I don’t suggest that it will work for all children as health is far more multifactorial than that, but to reduce the patient load on Medical Doctors/Pediatricians and to prevent unnecessary medication usage it only makes sense to have infants checked for movement restriction in their spine and the downstream effects it can have on the nervous system.

Stay healthy, Friends!

Dr. Adam Ball

p.s. If you don’t currently see a Doctor of Chiropractic and You or your loved ones are interested in making an appointment, you can book online here, or call my office at (705) 586-7873

Opinion Friday – on reading research…

Hey Folks!

No research today… I read some articles yesterday but lacked the patience to write about them yesterday. Life got a little busier than usual this past week. I think I’ll be reserving Fridays for some commentary on what I’ve read, which I’m sure will include the articles you’ve seen me review as well as others that didn’t deserve a post.

So here’s the deal – most people don’t read research. I mean really read it. So, to make things a little more realistic and give a small idea as to how I do it (which isn’t the “right” way, it’s just what I do to save time and to get to the truth as quickly as I can), I’ll explain my process.

Step 1 – pubmed or PLoS search for articles based on key words I’m interested in that day… simplicity is nice. “Gluten”, “Autoimmunity”, “Insulin sensitivity”, and so on.

Step 2 – Choose a sexy title to read about

Step 3 – Skim the Abstract for something interesting

Step 4 – Find the full text. Skip the abstract and intro.

Step 5 – Read the methods. They’re boring but they let you know what the researchers ACTUALLY DID… If we’re being smart, and it’s an RCT or other experiment – then we know the authors should ONLY be commenting on what the results of their study present.

Step 6 – Read the results. See what happened with their experiment.

Step 7 – Make your own conclusions. Skip the discussion and conclusion. This is where most get lazy. This is where most check the discussion, or probably more realistically, just the conclusion. They usually contain bias and give away the authors hopes and biases. “While our study did not support our hypothesis, the current literature suggests that blah blah is still suggested. Greater sample sizes and longer follow up is suggested to come to more accurate conclusions.” Or some other BS. Don’t read it – it’s there to trick you. Read the methods and results and make your own conclusions.

Step 8 – Hope that it was a good experiment. Use logic and intelligence to put the conclusions into context.

Step 9 – Find a new article to read after that.

If authors are abandoning their conclusions and bringing up poor references (Youdo check their references right?), then their word isn’t to be trusted, but you CAN still take the information their experiment created as it was usually designed with the hopes of supporting their hypothesis.

Anyway, I suppose I’m a little frustrated with the run-around you get when reading studies. It would be nice if all the published were the methods and results, but they don’t. Oh well… I suppose it’s the nature of humans.

Stay healthy, Friends!
Dr. Adam Ball

Research of the Day – Nov 14, 2012 – Exercise… It’s good for you… Surprise!

Hey Folks!
I’ve skimmed about a dozen articles today and can’t really find a topic or good quality article I feel like reading, so I chose an easy and semi-boring one, in my opinion. Either way, here it is:

Todays Article:

Resistance Training and Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Strength of the Evidence

What did they do:

  • Searched far and wide for articles regarding resistance training and type 2 diabetes outcomes, musculoskeletal outcomes and body composition outcomes between the years of 2000 and 2011.
  • Combined the results from all those studies into a meta-analysis to glean more accurate results than any one study on its’ own

What did they find:

  • 3 studies met the criteria! Not very many and not enough to create statistical significance that wasn’t already found in the original studies, but if you’re the author, you’ve already worked hard to find the info, so you combine it and analyze it anyway… Then it gives people like me an “ok” article to link to and say resistance exercise is good.
  • Resistance training was associated with better muscle strength, functionality and size
  • Resistance training had a favourable but non-significant (meaning it could have been chance) effect on HbA1C (a measure of how high and low your blood sugar gets over a period of time)
  • Moderate and small effects were also favourable for blood pressure and LDL cholesterol, respectively
  • Body composition was unchanged

What it means:

  • Exercise is good for you – could potentially reduce the signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes (and metabolic syndrome – associated with cardiovascular disease)
  • People got stronger before their body composition changed AKA You are going to get stronger FIRST, and THEN you’ll lose weight and look “cut”, “toned” or whatever other silly adjective you’d like to use for functionally designed
  • Blood pressure, cholesterol, and many other markers that are regularly measured to gauge health will improve when you exercise, but it takes time.

Not overly life changing findings, I know. But a nice reminder to keep up with the great efforts on the gym – If it’s important, do it every day.

Stay healthy, Friends!

Dr. Adam Ball

Research of the Day – Nov 13, 2012 – Weightlifting and injuries, so You’re saying there’s a chance…

Hey Folks!
Research of the day! I’m out a limb here – examining a paper reporting injury rates among Olympic Weightlifters. No one ever learned anything by turning a blind eye to the things they love just because they love them!

Todays Paper:

Injury Rates and Profiles of Elite Competitive Weightlifters

What they did:

  • They took data from USA weightlifting training camps (where the athletes train to prepare for world championships, olympics and other important competitions in weightlifting) regarding training hours, injury location, injury severity and injury nature
  • The weightlifting teams medical staff (MDs, physios, chiros, etc.) provided their information about any injuries that ocurred to the athletes while they were at the training camp with regard to type of injury (strain, sprain, contusion, fracture, etc.) location (knee, hip, elbow, etc.) nature (acute, chronic, recurring) and severity (time recommended to miss from training)
  • They took this data from 1990-1995

What they found:

  • Over the 6 years there were 560 injuries, of which 326 were located in the low back, knee or shoulder
  • 459 of those 560 injuries were considered a strain, sprain or tendonitis
  • 507 of the 560 injuries resulted in a recommendation of missing less than 1 day of training

What does it mean:

  • It means being competitive at Olympic Weightlifting carries about the same risk of injury as playing just about any other sport.
  • The authors suggest the injuries sustained are less severe as there isn’t any off centered or lateral movement during the weightlifting movements – lateral movements or off centered movements that are often attributed to causing stability injuries to soccer, football, and other sports players.
  • Rates of injuries and complaints in later life were similar to non-weightlifters, but not as bad as retired wrestlers.

What do I think:

  • We have the benefit of diversifying our training, and so not being exposed to the same movements every day (imagine training the snatch, clean and/or jerk, 6 times a day… THAT is repetition) – something that increases the chances of injury
  • We have the disadvantage of not being elite level athletes with thousands of hours of training and familiarity with the movements – something that would reduce the chances of injury
  • The point being… There’s ALWAYS risk to living life (and training). Daring to be great, pushing your comfort zone boundaries and endeavoring to be in better physical condition requires stresses being placed on the tissues of the body, which always carries a risk.
  • The question you can ask yourself is whether or not the risk is worth having better bone density, greater muscle mass and better insulin sensitivity, all things that are related to greater quality of life as well as greater longevity. You all know where I stand on this issue.
  • What we CAN do, is make sure we’re aiming for perfect form, that we’re making an effort to maintain a neutral spine at all times, that we’re keeping our shoulders in healthy positions when pulling or overhead, and that we’re pressurizing the trunk properly when bracing for a lift. THESE THINGS ARE IMPORTANT.
  • It’s also good to know that I’m not alone when my knees are a little achy after a heavy oly lifting session.

Stay healthy, Friends!

Dr. Adam Ball

Research of the Day – Nov 12, 2012 – Fish oil can help your liver… but it isn’t magical

Hey Folks!

Research of the Day time! Todays research is brought to you by my homework as well as the fact that I got a bunch of fish oil in at the office last week and am hoping to dish it out to whoever needs the best fish oil money can buy! Great price too – but if you’d prefer not to buy from me, that’s fine too, I’ll get through them all myself eventually otherwise.

Todays article:

Omega-3 fatty acids for the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

What they did:

  • Reviewed they literature regarding the use of Omega 3 fatty acids in the management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)

What they reported:

  • Omega 3 fats EPA and DHA are associated with greater oxidation of fat (using it for enegy) in the liver… meaning less accumulation.
  • Reduced inflammatory markers and increased non-inflammatory markers in the liver
  • They inhibited liver glycolysis and lipogenesis by reducing the expression of genes involved with activating those pathways (YOU MEAN THE ENVIRONMENT AFFECTED THE GENES???)
  • Diets high in cholesterol, sucrose or fructose fed to mice eventually led to NAFLD
  • They tested rats with deficiency of Omega 3 fatty acids for NAFLD, which they developed (along with insulin resistance), and then treated them with omega 3’s and they got better
  • They found when they changed their diet to a high fat diet with omega 3s they halted or REVERSED their NAFLD.
  • This even worked when the rats were leptin resistant too (a hormone that tells you when you’re satisfied AKA had enough food)
  • Omega 3 fats made the rats livers more resilient to injury then those rats without an omega 3 sufficient diet
  • Insulin sensitivity went up, inflammatory cytokines went down.

What does it mean???

  • It means fish oils are good for you. Especially if you’re deficient in them (like pretty much all of us are).
  • They increase insulin sensitivity (possibly by increasing cell membrane fluidity and by modulating gene expression)
  • They reduce inflammatory cytokines, which means less unnecessary inflammation.
  • They aren’t magic. You can’t cover up poop with perfume, so don’t take studies like these the wrong way and assume fish oil is the cure-all of the century. You still can’t eat like crap and just have some fish oil to fix it. Sorry.
  • You still need to exercise, sleep well, eat well, get your spine adjusted and take some vitamin D and fish oil to round out any deficiencies you may have. It just makes sense to create sufficiency where deficiency exists.

Have at it! If you’d like some fish oil from me, let me know – it’s in the office!

Stay healthy friends!

Dr. Adam Ball

Research of the Day – Nov 11, 2012 – Sleep your fat away!

Hey Folks!

Todays post will be short and sweet because I don’t have the full study (they cost money… a lot) and because I need to go to costco and then study.

Todays research paper:

Impaired Insulin Signaling in Human Adipocytes After Experimental Sleep Restriction: A Randomized, Crossover Study

What did they do:

  • They asked some patients to either sleep 4.5 hours or 8.5 hours per night for 4 days
  • Then they took some of their fat cells and measured the amount of insulin it took to Saturate the cells receptors to a certain degree
  • They also used an intravenous glucose tolerance test

What did they find:

  • They found the people in the sleep deprived group required almost 3 times as much insulin to cause the same glucose to go into the cell

What does it mean:

  • It means you can eat right, think right, and exercise your butt off, but if you aren’t sleeping well then you’re “peeing in the wind” as a previous blog post would suggest
  • Make sure you get GOOD sleep. NO lights. Cool room. 8-10 hours of sleep per night. Try taking some natural calm or your other magnesium supplement of choice (NOT magnesium oxide…. that stuff is just stones and you’ll poop them out the same way)
  • Your body secretes growth hormones and other sex hormones to aid in the repair of your body. It is CRUCIAL to great health AND!!!! it’s free! 🙂

Stay healthy Friends!

Dr. Adam Ball